Posts Tagged ‘canon’

Feature Car: Jason Spiteri’s EH Holden


29 Jan

I had the pleasure of photographing Jason Spiteri’s tough-as-nails 1964 EH Holden for the January 2019 issue of Street Machine magazine. Powered by a stout 427ci Dart SBC, the car is slammed in the weeds and ready to destroy tyres at a moment’s notice.

BUY A SHIRT, PRINT AND MORE!

As always, we’ve got a series of FREE desktop wallpaper images for you to enjoy. Simply CLICK HERE or on the thumbnails below to visit our Flickr page where all the goodies lay in wait for your visit.

Jason Spiteri's EH Holden
Jason Spiteri's EH Holden
Jason Spiteri's EH Holden

DEVIL’S ISLAND: Matt Sharp’s chopped, channelled and sectioned Model-A Ford Tudor


14 Aug

Matthew Sharp's 1930 Model-A Ford

DEVIL’S ISLAND

Devil’s member Matt Sharp’s bitchin’ chopped, channelled and sectioned ode to the heyday of hot rodding leaves us all hot and flustered
Words & Pics by: www.hoskingindustries.com.au

Matthew Sharp's 1930 Model-A FordThere’s little dispute that hot rodding’s heyday took place in the decades of the 1950s and ’60s. Most of the important innovations we still rely on today were developed in these years by ingenious and often crazy fabricators here and in the USA.

Names like Roth, Barris, Jon Kosmoski, Gene Winfield and so many more forged the way for builders at all levels to tinker with their tin in sheds all over the world, setting a pretty clear stylistic path while they were at it. While styles changed over the ensuing decades, the new millennium has seen a distinct shift back to the aesthetic ideals of the early days and 29-year-old Matthew Sharp’s 1930 Model A tudor is an excellent case in point.

Looking like something from a 1964 issue of Car Craft, this HOK Tangerine candy metal flake sled may look like some serious coin has been lavished on it, but it actually started as a budget build. “It started as a budget build and it stayed that way,” Matt says. “We built it to drive and have fun in.”Matthew Sharp's 1930 Model-A Ford

While you’d never know it now, the project actually began with a dented and damaged steel 1930 tudor body and rails. The car still retains both today. “The sides were pushed in, the doors were rough but it was a cheap start,” Matt says.

Having previously built a Commodore ute “with all the usual bling” and tinkering with jacked up 4X4s, this build was to be Matt’s first foray into rodding. Luckily for Matt, he had some exceptional assistance in the form of his father-in-law, the inimitable Tony Webster from Webby’s Speed Shop in Carrington, Newcastle NSW.

What you’re looking at now is actually the second iteration of the project, with the first being decidedly more ‘rat’. With the ethos of having fun and doing it cheaply, the undercoat and rust aesthetic worked perfectly for Matt, who drove the chopped and channelled tudor for a few years before hauling it off the road for a quick respray. “When we first finished it, we drove it from Newcastle to Philip Island via the Princess Highway for the Kustom Nationals, then drove it home again,” Matt says. “We started off pretty tentatively, but after we got past Sydney it was pretty relaxing. We figured if anything was going to go wrong, it would have happened by then.”

Matthew Sharp's 1930 Model-A FordRiding on the car’s original rails, the Model A is snake-belly low thanks to the 5in chop and 5in channel job. The car uses a classic combination of parts to achieve the desired results, like the torsion bar suspension, super tall 16in Firestone white walls and super furry, stark white faux fur trim. However, the driveline is a little different, using a Holden V8 with triple Strombergs in place of the usual small-block Chev’. This is then backed up by a T5 5-speed manual.

No matter where you look on Matt’s tudor, you’ll be greeted by a large amount of cool detail. Peek inside and check out that awesome instrument cluster housed within the headlight bucket or perhaps the cabin-mounted Moon fuel tank from the 1950s. Outside, dig on the cool recessed tail lights or the centrally-located exhaust pipes exiting through the lower part of the cabin behind the number plate. If that wasn’t enough, you gotta love the Mooneyes logos plasma cut into the sun visor or the beer bottle top pressed into the radiator grille. And you can miss all the excellent pin striping courtesy Smith Concepts.Matthew Sharp's 1930 Model-A Ford

“You know, I think if I were to do it all over again, I’d probably not repaint it like I did,” Matt says. “I had more fun in it when it was still a rat.”

As it is, Matt is looking to sell the tudor on to new owners for less than you could build it for yourself. He tells us it’s time to pay some money of the house and start work on a new project; no doubt with the help of Webby and the rest of his Devils club mates. We can’t wait to see it!

NOTE: If you think Matt’s Model-A looks familiar, it’s because it was later sold to Kyle at Smith Concepts, who turned it into this CLICK HERE

VEHICLE: 1930 Model A Ford
OWNER: Matthew Sharp
BODY: Steel tudor body, 5in chop, 5in channel, frenched tail lights, custom tonneau roof, plasma-cut Mooneyes motif in visor, House of Kolor Tangerine candy over metal flake
ENGINE: 308ci Holden V8, stock crank, stock rods, ACL 40-thou’ pistons, cast heads, Chev’ LT1 springs, Crane hydraulic cam’, high-volume oil pump, shortened Model A radiator, 3x Stromberg carbs, custom intake manifold, mechanical fuel pump, genuine 1950s Moon fuel tank, steel fuel lines, custom exhaust
TRANS: T5 5-speed, Exedy heavy-duty single-plate clutch, custom long-arm shifter
DIFF: Borg Warner, 2.89:1 final drive, LSD
INTERIOR: Moon steering wheel, custom bomber front seats, white faux fur trim, 1968 Dodge Phoenix speedo in Diamond T headlight bucket, factory dash, long-arm shifter, white vinyl trim on seats
SUSPENSION: Torsion bar front and rear, hot rod front shocks, spring car rear shocks
BRAKES: Commodore front discs, Falcon rear discs
WHEELS: 16in steel rims, Firestone white walls
THANKS TO: Webby’s Speed Shop, Hamilton Chrome, Tidy Trim, Joel Butcher, Shlong, Corey, Tony Bidner, my wife Nicole and her mum Sharyn, Smith Kustoms for the pin striping and Webby for everything

Feature Car: Jason McGrath’s 355ci Top 20 Elite Holden LC Torana


10 Jul

My photo shoot on Jason McGrath’s 355ci, Summernats Top 20 Elite, Holden LC Torana was featured in the June 201 issue of Street Machine magazine, which was on sale last month. It’s an immaculate little coupe, with detail for days.

BUY A SHIRT, PRINT AND MORE!

As always, we’ve got a series of FREE desktop wallpaper images for you to enjoy. Simply CLICK HERE or on the thumbnails below to visit our Flickr page where all the goodies lay in wait for your visit.

Jason McGrath's 355ci Elite Top 20 Holden LC Torana

Jason McGrath's 355ci Elite Top 20 Holden LC Torana

Jason McGrath's 355ci Elite Top 20 Holden LC Torana

Jason McGrath's 355ci Elite Top 20 Holden LC Torana

NATURE’S FURY: David McGinniss’ 428ci 1969 Mercury Cyclone


22 May

David McGinniss' 1969 Mercury Cyclone

NATURE’S FURY

Meet one of Ford’s rarer motorsport-influenced models, the NASCAR-homologation Mercury Cyclone
Words and Pics by www.hoskingindustries.com.au

David McGinniss' 1969 Mercury CycloneBy the mid-1960s the popularity of stock car racing was booming, leading to what many would call the sport’s golden age late in the decade with cars like the Ford Galaxies, Richard Petty’s Plymouth, Ford Torinos and Mercury Cyclones, much like the example featured here that belongs to David McGinniss. Indeed, NASCAR was largely dominated by Ford in the mid to late 1960s – a time when the race cars still had to be close derivatives of road-going models (homologated) like our dearly missed Touring Car series here in Australia up until the early 1990s.

Back then, racing was fierce, exciting and supremely dangerous. Vehicles one or lost not just on driver ability, but also on the inherent qualities of the vehicles themselves. OE manufacturers were still living by the ethos of ‘win on Sunday, sell on Monday’ and as a result, designed and built their cars to go fast.

Introduced in 1968, this iteration of the Mercury Cyclone came in various trim styles, including no fewer than 10 different engine combinations in the two years of production, when steel and oil were both still cheap. However, David’s example is a rare beast. This is a legit Cyclone CJ: one of only 3261 built, which is a piddling little number considering the volumes in which Ford used to build cars.David McGinniss' 1969 Mercury Cyclone

‘CJ’ stands for Cobra Jet, referring to the great lump of iron wedged between the sturdy chassis rails of the Cyclone. Measuring 428 cubic inches, it’s no small engine and came with an advertised output of 335bhp back in the year of its release. Besides the 429ci Boss that the NASCAR versions of the Cyclone were running in competition, there was nothing bigger or more powerful in the Ford line up than this bruiser.

Earlier in the model’s history, a few different variations on the body style existed, like convertibles and non-fastback coupes that were all known as Cyclones. Interestingly, by 1969 this was no longer the case, with non-fastback shapes known as Montegos and Comets, with the fastbacks – the same as David’s here – called Cyclones.

David originally purchased the Cyclone way back in November 1989 in original condition. Indeed, as it sits today most of the vehicle is true to factory specification including the interior, wheels, brakes, diff’ and C6 auto’. It’s still a matching-numbers 428ci, however David did rebuild the engine around 15 years ago, keeping pretty close to the original parts list save for a Mondello steel crank, better bearings and rings as well as the 735cfm Holley on top.

“It’s been an amazing car,” David says. “15 years on and it still drives fantastically.”

David McGinniss' 1969 Mercury CycloneNot afraid to make proper use of such a rare Ford, David piloted the Cyclone through the twists and turns of the Targa Tasmania on a number of occasions in the mid to late 1990s. The car performed well in its class, earning a second place in its class in 1996 and 1998. Considering the car’s weight, the weight over the nose and the archaic brakes and the fact he could steer it through the course is even more impressive. Take that Eric Bana!

While David says that owning the car has been a wonderful experience, he does admit it hasn’t always been a total walk in the park. “Finding spare parts for it has probably been one of the hardest parts of the rebuild and keeping it going,” David says. “That, and trying to convince people it isn’t a Torino!”

Sadly the glory days of truly exciting homologation motorsport have passed (not discounting the excellent racing the smaller and privateer classes do), so it’s nice to know there are still beautiful mechanical reminders of those times around to remind us. With dedicated and capable owners like David McGinniss there to keep these cubically endowed beasts on the road, we’ll hopefully have them around to enjoy for many more years to come.

Who knows, maybe we’ll be lucky enough to see an end to the current NASCAR and V8 Supercar boredom and return to some touring car excitement again on day. Imagine what the manufacturers could come up with then!

Owner: David McGinniss
Vehicle: 1969 Mercury Cyclone
Paint: Dulux Barlot red
Styling: Factory
Engine: 428ci Cobra Jet
Engine Mods: Mondello steel crank, stock rods and pistons (10.5:1-comp’), Pro Seal file-back rings, Clevite bearings, 735cfm Holley carb’, alloy catch can
Power: 410fwhp (305kW), 440lb.ft, 13.49sec ET
Exhaust: Custom 4-into-1 headers (2in primaries), twin 2.5in mild steel exhaust, twin mufflers
Gearbox: C6 auto
Diff: 3.55:1 final drive, LSD
Suspension: Bilstein front and rear shocks, 19mm front sway bar, variable-ratio steering rack
Brakes: Factory
Wheels/Tyres: Factory
Interior: Factory
Tunes: Factory
Build Time: 5 years
Bucks: $38,000
Who’s Responsible: Coasteer Automotive, Brenton Chere for the paint

Feature Car: Nathan Patterson’s 1978 Toyota KE30 Corolla


16 May

My stock in trade seems to be of the Holden and Ford varieties. But sometimes I get to shoot far more unusual and interesting beasts. Nathan’s L98-powered 1978 KE30 Corolla is one of those. Bought from an old lady called Thelma, the little sedan now makes some 550rwhp and rips hellacious skids at the drop of a hat. It was featured in the May issue of Street Machine.

BUY A SHIRT, PRINT AND MORE!

As always, we’ve got a series of FREE desktop wallpaper images for you to enjoy. Simply CLICK HERE or on the thumbnails below to visit our Flickr page where all the goodies lay in wait for your visit.

Nathan Patterson's 1978 Toyota KE30 Corolla

Nathan Patterson's 1978 Toyota KE30 Corolla

Nathan Patterson's 1978 Toyota KE30 Corolla

VINTAGE MODERN: Davin Cochrane’s LS1-Powered Holden LH Torana


10 May

Davin Cochrane's LS1-Powered LH Holden Torana

VINTAGE MODERN

Davin Cochrane saved this LH sedan from oblivion and gave it a new, high-tech lease on life.
Story and Pics by hoskingindustries.com.au

Davin Cochrane's LS1-Powered LH Holden Torana“A friend had seen a Torana near his house sitting under a tree out near Baradine,” starts 43-year-old Davin Cochrane. “It had been sitting there quietly for quite some time. I made contact with the owner and got hold of a car trailer to go pick it up.”

Davin paid the princely sum of $2000 for the LH back in April 2008, hauling the hulk several hours back to his home base south of Newcastle in NSW. No doubt there was more than one session of serious cleaning before the true condition of the car was revealed.

“A number of family members looked at the car and thought it was a piece of junk, but I could see the potential,” Davin says. “Considering what we wanted the outcome of the restoration to be, we decided ‘no regrets’ was the way to go.”

Before a spanner got turned in the name of restoration, Davin hatched his plan on what he thought the LH should become in its new phase of life. “At the time we started the project, there was only a couple of Toranas running GenIIIs that we were aware of,” he says. “It also had to be a manual. So an LS1 with a 6-speed sounded like the go.”Davin Cochrane's LS1-Powered LH Holden Torana

LS1 conversions were pretty thin on the ground in 2008 and as a result, finding parts wasn’t all that simple. Davin started out with some CRS mount and cross member parts, while working with an electrician in QLD fabricating a custom wiring harness to suit the applications. However, there were more pressing matters on Davin’s radar than jamming a new drivetrain into the Torana – like the rusted body.

“We stripped the car and had it blasted first,” Davin says. “There were lots of rust holes and the roof had been caved in, as though the local kids had been using it to land on when jumping out of the tree it used to sit under.”

“The panel guy looked the car over and recommended we start with another body. Not to be put off, I persuaded them to continue with the original car, even if it ended up costing a bit more.”

Davin Cochrane's LS1-Powered LH Holden ToranaDespite the hard slog the paint and panel guys faced, it wasn’t too long before Davin had the car back in his possession and he could now turn his attention solely toward the fun stuff like the engine conversion and running gear. Davin looked around and found a guy who had a 255kW VX-spec’ LS1 he had planned to put into a hatch. With only 67,000kms on the clock, Davin swooped in on the engine.

“We deleted the power steering and had to fit a sump with the pickup at the back due to the cross member,” Davin says. “We found a T56 from a wrecked Maloo with only 35,000kms on the clock, which is where we met our next problem.”

That problem was a transmission that was significantly larger than the Torana’s trans’ tunnel would accommodate. While he tried to work around the problem, Davin had no option but to face up to it and grab the angle grinder. When the gap ended up too large to simply weld shut, a friend of his came to the rescue, allowing Davin to cut out the tunnel from a Commodore he was wrecking.Davin Cochrane's LS1-Powered LH Holden Torana

Over the course of the build, Davin faced a number of other conversion issues – as you might well imagine would be the case when trying to join 21st century technology to archaic 1970s Holden hardware. Auto and Marine Instruments in Victoria converted the original factory gauges to electronic units to overcome the speedo output from the T56; subsequently giving Davin the ability to recalibrate the speedo easily himself down the track.

With the bits and pieces sorted and the car getting close to driveable, Davin sourced a set of wide Simmons FR18s that hide the Hoppers Stoppers brakes. The FRs really fill out the SLR-style flares and the gunmetal centres work well against the blinding Sting Red paintwork.

“I initially thought the classic Marlboro racing colours would be cool, however others in the family didn’t think cigarette advertising was a good idea,” Davin says. “Steve and his team at South Lakes Smash did a really good job on the car with the hours they spent saving the body.”

Simmons and SLR styling. LH Torana and GenIII power. This mixing up of eras and merging of styles can also be found inside the car where Davin combines the immaculate original class of the Torana vinyl with a modern steering wheel, race buckets and Autometer gauges.

All told, Davin should be proud of the results he’s achieved with the LH. It’s gone from a rusted, caved in wreck under a tree to a being a potent, current and ultimately tasty retrotech machine that is sure to continue hunting unsuspecting ricers on our nation’s roads for decades to come. While the greenies might argue the point, we reckon that’s an excellent case of conservationism!

Owner: Davin Cochrane
Colour: Sting Red w/blackouts
Bodywork: SLR-5000
Engine Type: VX 5.7L LS1
Engine Mods: Custom harness, PWR alloy radiator, Aeromotive FPR and gauge, Edelbrock alloy inline fuel filter, braided fuel lines, PWR alloy radiator overflow tank, thermo fan, custom sump, deleted power steering
Power: Untested
Exhaust: Custom ceramic coated headers, twin mild steel system
Gearbox: Maloo T56
Diff: 9in, 2.75:1 final drive, LSD, custom tail shaft
Brakes: 330mm Hoppers Stoppers front disc and twin-piston caliper kit, 300mm rear Hoppers Stoppers disc kit, 7in double-diaphragm booster
Suspension: PCD swap to HQ pattern
Wheels/Tyres: Simmons FR18 rims
Other mods: Everything rechromed, halogen headlights, VDO electronic dash conversion
Interior: Autometer ‘Bowtie’ ancillary gauges, SAAS steering wheel, front race seats, fresh roof lining and door trims
Stereo: Pioneer CD player and rear coaxial speakers
Build Period: 3 years
Cost: Undisclosed
Thanks: Killa Kustom Kables, Auto and Marine Instruments, Gibson’s Driveshaft Services, Hoppers Stoppers, Hamilton Chrome, Grant Roberts Automotive, Cools Autotrim, South Lakes Smash Repairs

Feature Car: Michael Ceyhan’s Ford XD Fairmont


26 Mar

Michael Ceyhan’s immaculate Ford XD Fairmont appeared in the March issue of Street Machine. It runs a 434ci Dart Eagle-based stroker that’s run a 10.9sec ET, but Michael says he didn’t build the car to race. Front to back, top to bottom – including the detailed undercarriage – it’s a fitting testament to as beloved dad.

BUY A SHIRT, PRINT AND MORE!

As always, we’ve got a series of FREE desktop wallpaper images for you to enjoy. Simply CLICK HERE or on the thumbnails below to visit our Flickr page where all the goodies lay in wait for your visit.

Michael Ceyhan's Ford XD Fairmont

Michael Ceyhan's Ford XD Fairmont

Michael Ceyhan's Ford XD Fairmont

Feature Car: Ben Brown’s 1972 Chevrolet Chevelle


05 Mar

Despite a rough start thanks to a half-asses reality TV project build quality, Ben brown turned things around and ended up with a sweet, blown and billet Chevy Chevelle all his own. The 383ci SBC-powered coupe was featured in the January issue of Street Machine and will appear in Super Chevy soon.

BUY A SHIRT, PRINT AND MORE!

As always, we’ve got a series of FREE desktop wallpaper images for you to enjoy. Simply CLICK HERE or on the thumbnails below to visit our Flickr page where all the goodies lay in wait for your visit.

Ben Brown's 1972 Chevrolet Chevelle

Ben Brown's 1972 Chevrolet Chevelle

Ben Brown's 1972 Chevrolet Chevelle

Feature Car: Steve Santos’ XY Ford Falcon ‘BOSSXY’


02 Feb

I was asked to shoot Steve Santos’ awesome, modern take on the classic XY Ford Falcon for Street Machine magazine and it appeared in the January 2017 issue, which was on sale last month. The car boasts plenty of retrotech features, with the most obvious being the supercharged, quad-cam, injected Boss engine from the late model Falcons. Then there is, of course, those monstrous 22in Simmons FR rims!

BUY A SHIRT, PRINT AND MORE!

As always, we’ve got a series of FREE desktop wallpaper images for you to enjoy. Simply CLICK HERE or on the thumbnails below to visit our Flickr page where all the goodies lay in wait for your visit.

Steve Santos' XY Ford Falcon

Steve Santos' XY Ford Falcon

Steve Santos' XY Ford Falcon

Feature Car: Lorenzo Capogna’s XA Ford Fairmont


29 Jan

This is the second time I’ve been lucky enough to photograph Lorenzo Capogna’s tough-as XA Ford Fairmont sedan, with the first being for Street Fords a couple of years back. This shoot appeared in the December 2017 issue of Street Machine. You can see the first shoot HERE.
With a stout 393ci Cleveland stroker, C4 and 9in with 4.11:1 gears, it’s a monster of a street car. Lorenzo also builds brutal engines for Harley Davidsons!

BUY A SHIRT, PRINT AND MORE!

As always, we’ve got a series of FREE desktop wallpaper images for you to enjoy. Simply CLICK HERE or on the thumbnails below to visit our Flickr page where all the goodies lay in wait for your visit.

Lorenzo Capogna's XA Ford Fairmont

Lorenzo Capogna's XA Ford Fairmont

Lorenzo Capogna's XA Ford Fairmont