Posts Tagged ‘hot rod’

DEVIL’S ISLAND: Matt Sharp’s chopped, channelled and sectioned Model-A Ford Tudor


14 Aug

Matthew Sharp's 1930 Model-A Ford

DEVIL’S ISLAND

Devil’s member Matt Sharp’s bitchin’ chopped, channelled and sectioned ode to the heyday of hot rodding leaves us all hot and flustered
Words & Pics by: www.hoskingindustries.com.au

Matthew Sharp's 1930 Model-A FordThere’s little dispute that hot rodding’s heyday took place in the decades of the 1950s and ’60s. Most of the important innovations we still rely on today were developed in these years by ingenious and often crazy fabricators here and in the USA.

Names like Roth, Barris, Jon Kosmoski, Gene Winfield and so many more forged the way for builders at all levels to tinker with their tin in sheds all over the world, setting a pretty clear stylistic path while they were at it. While styles changed over the ensuing decades, the new millennium has seen a distinct shift back to the aesthetic ideals of the early days and 29-year-old Matthew Sharp’s 1930 Model A tudor is an excellent case in point.

Looking like something from a 1964 issue of Car Craft, this HOK Tangerine candy metal flake sled may look like some serious coin has been lavished on it, but it actually started as a budget build. “It started as a budget build and it stayed that way,” Matt says. “We built it to drive and have fun in.”Matthew Sharp's 1930 Model-A Ford

While you’d never know it now, the project actually began with a dented and damaged steel 1930 tudor body and rails. The car still retains both today. “The sides were pushed in, the doors were rough but it was a cheap start,” Matt says.

Having previously built a Commodore ute “with all the usual bling” and tinkering with jacked up 4X4s, this build was to be Matt’s first foray into rodding. Luckily for Matt, he had some exceptional assistance in the form of his father-in-law, the inimitable Tony Webster from Webby’s Speed Shop in Carrington, Newcastle NSW.

What you’re looking at now is actually the second iteration of the project, with the first being decidedly more ‘rat’. With the ethos of having fun and doing it cheaply, the undercoat and rust aesthetic worked perfectly for Matt, who drove the chopped and channelled tudor for a few years before hauling it off the road for a quick respray. “When we first finished it, we drove it from Newcastle to Philip Island via the Princess Highway for the Kustom Nationals, then drove it home again,” Matt says. “We started off pretty tentatively, but after we got past Sydney it was pretty relaxing. We figured if anything was going to go wrong, it would have happened by then.”

Matthew Sharp's 1930 Model-A FordRiding on the car’s original rails, the Model A is snake-belly low thanks to the 5in chop and 5in channel job. The car uses a classic combination of parts to achieve the desired results, like the torsion bar suspension, super tall 16in Firestone white walls and super furry, stark white faux fur trim. However, the driveline is a little different, using a Holden V8 with triple Strombergs in place of the usual small-block Chev’. This is then backed up by a T5 5-speed manual.

No matter where you look on Matt’s tudor, you’ll be greeted by a large amount of cool detail. Peek inside and check out that awesome instrument cluster housed within the headlight bucket or perhaps the cabin-mounted Moon fuel tank from the 1950s. Outside, dig on the cool recessed tail lights or the centrally-located exhaust pipes exiting through the lower part of the cabin behind the number plate. If that wasn’t enough, you gotta love the Mooneyes logos plasma cut into the sun visor or the beer bottle top pressed into the radiator grille. And you can miss all the excellent pin striping courtesy Smith Concepts.Matthew Sharp's 1930 Model-A Ford

“You know, I think if I were to do it all over again, I’d probably not repaint it like I did,” Matt says. “I had more fun in it when it was still a rat.”

As it is, Matt is looking to sell the tudor on to new owners for less than you could build it for yourself. He tells us it’s time to pay some money of the house and start work on a new project; no doubt with the help of Webby and the rest of his Devils club mates. We can’t wait to see it!

NOTE: If you think Matt’s Model-A looks familiar, it’s because it was later sold to Kyle at Smith Concepts, who turned it into this CLICK HERE

VEHICLE: 1930 Model A Ford
OWNER: Matthew Sharp
BODY: Steel tudor body, 5in chop, 5in channel, frenched tail lights, custom tonneau roof, plasma-cut Mooneyes motif in visor, House of Kolor Tangerine candy over metal flake
ENGINE: 308ci Holden V8, stock crank, stock rods, ACL 40-thou’ pistons, cast heads, Chev’ LT1 springs, Crane hydraulic cam’, high-volume oil pump, shortened Model A radiator, 3x Stromberg carbs, custom intake manifold, mechanical fuel pump, genuine 1950s Moon fuel tank, steel fuel lines, custom exhaust
TRANS: T5 5-speed, Exedy heavy-duty single-plate clutch, custom long-arm shifter
DIFF: Borg Warner, 2.89:1 final drive, LSD
INTERIOR: Moon steering wheel, custom bomber front seats, white faux fur trim, 1968 Dodge Phoenix speedo in Diamond T headlight bucket, factory dash, long-arm shifter, white vinyl trim on seats
SUSPENSION: Torsion bar front and rear, hot rod front shocks, spring car rear shocks
BRAKES: Commodore front discs, Falcon rear discs
WHEELS: 16in steel rims, Firestone white walls
THANKS TO: Webby’s Speed Shop, Hamilton Chrome, Tidy Trim, Joel Butcher, Shlong, Corey, Tony Bidner, my wife Nicole and her mum Sharyn, Smith Kustoms for the pin striping and Webby for everything

RAT CAT: Paul Lonergran’s incredible DIY 327ci Phantom ’28 Dodge


28 Jun

Paul Lonergran's Insane 1928 Dodge Rat Rod

RAT CAT

Paul Lonergran’s incredible 327ci phantom ’28 Dodge is a snake-belly-low rat rod that sets the bench mark for all others to follow – and does it cheap
Words & Pics by: www.hoskingindustries.com.au

Paul Lonergran's Insane 1928 Dodge Rat RodWe’ve run some bloody cool rat rods in our time here at Heavy Duty Hot Rods. Rat rods, when built to their true ethos of remaining cheap, encouraging parts scrounging and making rodding fun and hassle free, can really test a builder’s skills of sourcing and repurposing old bits and pieces into something new and exciting.

Sure, there have been some instances over the last decade of guys building big dollar ‘rats’ with the look of a rat rod, but offering mod-cons. We’ve even seen a fibreglass mid-’30s rod repainted to look like it was rusty. But the best rat rods will always be the ones that have risen from the pile of rusty parts that have been wasting away at the back of the shed.

For 39-year-old Paul Lonegran of PTL Fabrications on the Central Coast of NSW, building a rat rod hadn’t seriously entered his mind until someone planted the seed. “Well, actually a guy called ‘Black Plug’ inspired me to build this,” Paul says. “He asked me at a club meeting if I had anything to do with hot rods. As I’d been around rods all my life and have owned more than 20 cars over the years, I decided to build this to shut him up.”

Having previously owned and built a number of cars including a 1961 Studebaker, ’36 Terraplane and a couple of ’37 Ford coupes, Paul was no stranger to vintage tin. And as you may have guessed from that list, he’s no stranger to old cars that are just a little bit different.Paul Lonergran's Insane 1928 Dodge Rat Rod

This here low-slung rusty bucket definitely falls into the different category. Paul tells us the body – hand fabricated by Paul – is meant to represent a 1929 Dodge. From a few metres back you’d be forgiven for thinking it might actually be some original chopped, channelled and sectioned vintage tin. But get closer and you’ll see the square tube frame underneath onto which Paul bent up the steel body panels before coating them in red oxide primer and scallops.

Behind all the surface rust and corrosion is a plethora of parts from Paul’s apparently extensive collection of goodies that he says he’s had gathering dust for around 18 years. Indeed, when quizzed on the final price of the build project, he smiles and tells us it came to a grand total of $42.

Paul Lonergran's Insane 1928 Dodge Rat RodPaul’s rat is powered by a 327ci small-block that Paul rebuilt himself using the stock crank, Carillo rods and Arias pistons. With a static compression ratio of 11.8:1 when squeezing the AVGAS against the ported cast heads, it’s no slouch, providing 480fwhp to this light weight go-kart.

This is backed by a T350 and HQ Holden Salisbury rear end with steep 4.44:1 gears. We’d be surprised if the rat was ever able to get traction on those old Goodyear stock car slicks with a combo like this.

Look inside and you’ll find the epitome of Spartan cockpits. Considering it’s always open to the weather and the interior of a rat rod, it’s probably for the best. But just look at it: custom buckets fabricated from a 60L drum, rusty custom instrument fascia with vintage gauges and decaying Anglia steering wheel and column.

“Installing that Anglia column and wheel was probably one of the highlights for me,” Paul says. “I used to sit in one and steer it when I was four years old with my grandfather.”

With an insane completed cost of under $50 and a build time of just two weeks, Paul certainly stuck it to old ‘Black Plug’. And with a trophy for Best Rat Rod at the 2010 Taren Point Rat Day as further vindication, who can argue that this is one of the coolest rats you’re likely to find?

VEHICLE: 1928 Dodge (phantom)
OWNER: Paul Lonegran
BODY: Hand-built cab, red oxide primer, pin striping, scallops
ENGINE: 327ci SBC, stock crank, Carillo rods, Arias pistons (11.8:1 compression), Thompson rings, ARP mains studs, ported cast heads, stainless valves, Isky springs, Corvette rocker covers, Offy breathers, Isky solid cam’, solid lifters, chrome moly pushrods, Crow 1.6:1 rockers, Melling oil pump, custom sump, custom pulleys, 1946 International radiator, 850cfm Holley, Holley intake manifold, Bosch coil, modified Chev’ dizzy, Holley fuel pump, Reg Rocket ‘Hillbilly’ headers
PERFORMANCE: 480fwhp
TRANS: T350, 4200rpm stall, manualised
DIFF: HQ Holden Salisbury, 4.44:1 final drive, 1-piece tail shaft, LSD
INTERIOR: 1949 Ford Anglia steering wheel and steering column, custom seats made from 60L drums, custom instrument fascia, vintage gauges
SUSPENSION: “Suicide steer, Ford style”, front transverse leaf spring, Monroe shocks, rear leaf spring
BRAKES: Deleted front brakes, HQ rear drums
WHEELS: 13x5in Holden front steel wheels, custom 15x9in rear steel wheels, Goodyear Stock Car Special rear tyres
THANKS TO: Shacko

SO COOL: Leon Julien’s DIY Kustom FC Holden Wagon


12 Jun

Leon Julien's 1959 FC Holden Wagon

SO COOL

There are FC Holdens and then there is Leon Julien’s FC wagon. Built under a 3x6m marquee, this blown six retro rocket is a total winner
Words & Pics by: www.hoskingindustries.com.au

Leon Julien's 1959 FC Holden WagonWe’ve featured the gamut of custom cars in our time: from high dollar workshop builds with no interesting back story attached, right through to some of the most bare-bones, DIY, budget builds with stories of heroic feats of self-taught snapper twirling the world has ever known and everything in between. Then there’s 37-year-old Leon Julien and his FC wagon known as FCCOOL.

“I’ve had an interest in FC Holdens since I was about six years old,” Leon says. “My uncle had a van that he ended up rebuilding. But it wasn’t until year seven in high school that I travelled over night from Sydney to Grafton in that van that I made it a life goal to build my own FC and do the same trip.”

By rights, we should not be drooling over Leon’s retro-chic FC, but instead looking on lovingly at an FE sedan. “I only bought the FC wagon as a parts car for the FE I was building,” Leon says. “But when I got it, I realised it still had nine months rego on it, so I drove it for those nine months and became attached to it.”

This was way back in 1995, when grunge was still going about its business of killing hair metal and the country was emerging from the ‘recession we had to have’. With the decision made to swap trajectories and rebuild the wagon, the dash and the engine block from the FE sedan were swapped over to the FC, but it can’t have been much to look at at the time.Leon Julien's 1959 FC Holden Wagon

“It had house paint covering any repairs when I got it,” Leon says. “There were undressed welds, dents whacked out with a hammer and mould on the roof and bonnet, but it had a good running grey motor and three-on-the-tree.”

This is where the story starts becoming truly remarkable. Without the aid of even the most rudimentary single-car garage to work in, Leon resorted to performing the bulk of the work on the car under the meagre shelter of a 6x3m marquee!

Over time, Leon restored the existing metal work and significantly altered it along the way. Look closely, past the more obvious custom grille (featuring door knobs as depicted in a ‘how-to’ article from 1963) and slanted 1953 Edsel head light mods, to the shaved handles and side chrome, frenched tail lights and aerial holes, front indicators, EK tail gate, radiused door openings and bonnet treatment. Leon’s FC is a smorgasbord of tasty metal mods that’ll have you gawking for hours – all performed in the front yard!

“One of my favourite moments during the build would have been the morning after I put the final coats of paint on,” Leon says. “I was pulling all-nighters in the driveway, watching the sun rise as I put parts back on the car while neighbours peered through their blinds, thinking I was nuts.”

Leon Julien's 1959 FC Holden WagonLeon’s retro-rific rig isn’t all about the bodywork, though – as impressive it is that he could pull off such a good job in the front yard. The FC also boasts a tough little Holden six.

Built around the 179ci that Leon originally had in his FE, Westend Performance built him up a nice 208ci stroker using 3.3L rotating parts, held together with ARP studs and fasteners. The cast head was ported and treated to a meaty solid valvetrain, helping the breathing even further. If that weren’t enough, Leon went about fabricating a trick blower setup using a Commodore-spec’ Eaton M90 supercharger that he’s got rigged up to run 8psi.

This combo is backed by a Trimatic and an old Banjo rear end that’s holding up to the punishment so far. “I’ve been running this engine block since 1994 and have given it a good workout in that time,” he says. “I don’t really understand why people always say these things are weak.”

“I built this car for the odd trip down the drag strip, carting the family on long distance trips to car shows and cruising around town,” he says. “It goes like the clappers, drives quite smoothly, doesn’t use a lot of fuel and has pretty good throttle response. I love that it also seems to get more attention than a lot of other high-dollar builds.”

With a slew of trophies under its belt already and with the Julien clan attending plenty of shows up and down the east coast, the FC is sure to continue winning fans the more it’s seen. However, it’s unlikely to look the same each time you see it, with Leon continually working to improve the package.

All hail the DIY king!

VEHICLE: 1959 FC Holden
OWNER: Leon Julien
BODY: White/blue two tone (high opacity white, tinted with green/blue tinter under white pearl), custom grille, frenched tail lights, all seams welded, EK tail gate, door corners radiused, guards welded to body, shaved handles, side trim shaved, twin frenched aerial holes, hood corners radiused, frenched indicators, canted 1958 Edsel headlights
ENGINE: 1964 179ci Holden six (stroked to 208ci), block decked and O-ringed, Holden black 3.3L crank, 3.3L rods, ACL Race Series pistons, ARP mains stud kit, ACL bearings, ported cast head, copper head gasket, Camtech solid cam’, Yella Terra 1.5:1 rockers, Manley pushrods, straight-cut gear drive, JP high-volume oil pump, EH sump, 2x 14in thermo fans, HQ V8 radiator, 85A alternator, Ross balancer, custom blower pulley, modified HS8 SU carb’, Eaton M90 supercharger (8psi), regraphed Bosch VK Commodore electronic distributor, Crane Cams LX92 coil, Crane Hi6 TRC-2 w/map sensor, custom wiring harness, Mallory Comp 140 fuel pump, Mallory billet FPR, 6-2-1 headers, 2.75in mild steel exhaust, H&M muffler
TRANS: Trimatic, 2800rpm stall, modified valve body
DIFF: Banjo, 2.78:1 final drive, LX Torana tail shaft
INTERIOR: Repainted EH Holden steering wheel, custom plush pile carpets, white vinyl roof lining, chromed instrument cluster fascia and glove box, NOS 1960’s Stewart Warner gauges, JVC head unit, Rockford Fosgate power amp’, Cerwin Vega front speakers, Diamond Audio rear speakers, Sony 6x9in behind factory dash grille, Dynamat Extreme sound deadener
SUSPENSION: HR Holden front, Pedders front springs, Gabriel shocks, reset rear leaf springs, adjustable Gabriel rear shocks, on-board compressor and control solenoids for rear, HR Holden steering arms, EH Holden steering column, 50x50mm box from sub frame to leaf spring hangers
BRAKES: HR Holden front discs, HR rear drums, Bendix pads and shoes, VH40 booster, braided lines
WHEELS: Stock 13in steel rims
THANKS TO: West End Performance, Active Transmissions, Motorsport Connections, Better Brakes – Blacktown, American Autos, FC/FC Holden forum, GMH Torana forum, OzRodders forum

PURE PLATINUM: Scott Briggs’ 350ci 1932 Ford Coupe


06 Jun

Scott Briggs' 1932 Ford Coupe

PURE PLATINUM

Trik Trim’s Scott Briggs built this awesome and totally classic 1932 coupe in his spare time. With a potent SBC and tonnes of style, we reckon it’s a winner
Words & Pics by: www.hoskingindustries.com.au

Scott Briggs' 1932 Ford CoupeIt’s easy to feel like ‘you’ve seen one ’32, you’ve seen ’em all’, but then sometimes you stumble across one that seems to offer something just a little different. Mid-north Coast resident Scott Briggs might have built his ’32 3-window using an almost perfectly classic combination of parts, yet thanks to his use of colour, intense attention to detail and skills with the needle and thread this silver high boy stands out from the crowd.

A trimmer by trade, it goes without saying that Scott’s 3-window boasts a well executed interior. But this Ford is much more than that. No matter where you look, you’ll find attention to detail that would leave a number of dedicated show rods in the dust, yet this car has been built with cruising in mind.

“Since my last build took five years to complete due to my wife having two beautiful daughters, I thought this build would go much faster,” Scott says. “As it turned out, it still took four years.”

“Once I’d finished the ’34 roadster I built last time, I thought ‘no more for a while’, but as usual, within a few months I was champing at the bit to start something new. I think it’s the challenge involved when you’re a fussy bastard like me and insist on doing most things yourself.”Scott Briggs' 1932 Ford Coupe

Sourcing a body and chassis from Elvis at Rod Bods, Scott had the basic ingredients for his new ride. In the interests of reliability and ease, a 350ci SBC crate engine was chosen to power the rod, with an equally classic T350 backing this up. Just to ensure the recipe was as classic as possible, a 9in lives at the end of the power package, using highway-friendly 3.25:1 gears.

“The car was always going to be black,” Scott says. “But at the eleventh hour I changed my mind and went for a silver colour from the Honda catalogue. I’m now thankful I did, because it’s just that little bit different.”

Sprays by his neighbours over at Colour Worx, the paint is still straight off the gun as you see it here in the pictures. Not that you’d know it, with the glowing silver laid down smoother than the proverbial baby’s bum. It covers everything up top and under the car, too.

Scott Briggs' 1932 Ford Coupe“I had a hectic few months leading up to October last year to get it finished for rego,” Scott says. “We made it, but it was three months of running my business by day and using all available weekends and nights after work on the car. After that effort I was glad to see the rego sticker applied.”

With the rego successfully obtained, Scott decided to take a breather and parked the car in the shed for a few months, finishing things off properly when he had the time. While it looks complete to the casual observer, the ever-picky Scott says it’s never finished, with the boot being the biggest of the little things left to complete.

You can get a good idea for how that will look by having a good hard squizz in the cabin. It’s in here that Scott’s expertise really came into play.

Dressed in a striking red leather sourced from Ford Performance Vehicles, the contract between the exterior silver and the interior red is more than appealing to both one’s sense of sight and smell. Thankfully, despite this being the personal vehicle of a trimmer, the car doesn’t feature some gaudy, overblown visual extravaganza inside. Instead, it’s a tasteful trim following classic lines that suit the rest of the car. But don’t let that make you think it’s some simple, throwaway piece. There are plenty of details in there for you to find. For example, flip the Glide bench over and find the 6x9in speakers hiding back there. Better, see how the lines created in the door skins flow around the cabin into the other panels. Nice.Scott Briggs' 1932 Ford Coupe

“One of my first drives in the car with my brother (once we’d spent an hour getting the speedo calibrated) was a cruise to the beach,” Scott says. “We pulled up in the car park to find a large puddle of trans’ fluid pooling under the car. Thinking the worst, we got under there to find that the trans’ sump plug had actually gotten hooked on a speed hump, spinning it loose. A call to my wife and three litres of fluid later and we were all good to go.”

If Scott’s ’32 isn’t one of the most tasteful rolling business cards around, we don’t know what is. If the crowds circling the car at the recent Autumnfest event in Taree are anything to go by, it’s bound to get Trik Trim some new business!

VEHICLE: 1932 Ford Coupe
OWNER: Scott Briggs
BODY: Honda silver, frenched aerial hole
ENGINE: 350ci crate SBC, cast heads, 600cfm Holley, Edelbrock intake manifold, MSD distributor and coil, finned rocker covers and breathers, alloy engine pulleys, chromed alternator, solid engine mounts, thermo fan,  spark leads, 4-into-1 block huggers, twin 2in stainless exhaust
TRANS: T350, shift kit, shortened Fairlane tail shaft
DIFF: 9in, 3.23:1 final drive, LSD
INTERIOR: Ford FPV red leather trim, cut-pile carpets, red roof lining, Dolphin gauges, Grant steering wheel, retractable seat belts, Glide front bench, JVC head unit, Earthquake power amp, JVC front speakers, Pioneer 6x9in rear speakers
SUSPENSION: Dropped I-beam front, rear coil-overs, stainless 4-link, raised rear rails
BRAKES: XF Falcon front rotors, VS Commodore front calipers, Ford V8 rear drums, stainless braided lines
WHEELS: 15in Cragar alloy rims (6in front, 7in rear)
THANKS TO: Trik Trim, Rod Bods, Colour Worx, Phoenix Restos, my wife Sarah and daughters Kodi and Abbey for their understanding during the build

HEIRLOOM: Dave Kracht’s Lexus-Powered 1940 Ford Sloper


30 May

Dave Kracht's 1940 Ford Sloper

HEIRLOOM

Dave Kracht’s 1940 Sloper has been in the family since 1964 and it’s never looked better
Words and Pics: www.hoskingindustries.com.au

Dave Kracht's 1940 Ford Sloper“The car was originally bought and built by my dad in 1964,” starts Dave Kracht, the current ‘custodian’ of this immaculate and understated Aussie 1940 Ford Sloper Deluxe. “He was a member of the Romans Hot Rod Club.”

Incredibly, the Ford has never left the Kracht family in all those years. Thanks to a seven year rebuild completed in 2009 the car has a new lease on life that will see it cruising our nation’s roads for plenty more.

“The car was in many shows in the 1960s and won many awards,” Dave says. “In 1968 dad ‘finished’ it and it won Top Tudor at the Sydney State Titles show at Roselands.”

In around 1971 Kracht senior pulled the car apart to give it a new drive train, but Dave says he lost interest in the ’40 and it sat dormant until the late 1980s when Dave took over. “I had it in various guises over the years,” Dave explains. “The last iteration saw it painted black with flames and a sidevalve V8, Halibrand diff’ and white walls on steelies.”Dave Kracht's 1940 Ford Sloper

Fast forward to 2002 and Dave embarked upon the car’s most extensive and decidedly tasty rebuild. The project would take seven years and see just about every nut, bolt and component replaced or refinished.

“Most of the rebuild took place in Ralph Stapley’s workshop in Bathurst,” Dave says. “Ralph was a good friend of my dad’s and a fellow Romans member.”

Dave says the object of the build was to create a rod that was a good driver “that you could drive interstate with ease and comfort”. I think you’ll agree with Dave when he says that objective was completed.

“It took a lot more work and time that we expected,” Dave admits. “That included a lot of bodywork to get a good fit and finish.”

Dave Kracht's 1940 Ford SloperFellow Bathurst local Ray Tobin took care of the bulk of the body work, with the Lost Green finish applied by The Repair Wizard back in Dave’s home town of Katoomba in NSW’s Blue Mountains. The result is a clean, understated and timeless look complemented by the factory bright work and those sweet Coddington alloys.

Dave’s ’40 isn’t all paint and body though, with the engine and drive train proving just as interesting. When your objective is to create a vehicle capable of easy interstate travel, it’s hard to go past a late-model motor and Dave’s choice of a quad-cam’ Lexus V8 borders on genius.

Not only is the Lexus a refined, robust and downright bullet proof engine, it’s also easy on the juice, comes with air-con and cruise control and makes all the right sounds when coupled with a decent exhaust. The Ford boasts a set of custom 4-into-1 ceramic coated headers and a twin stainless system, making sure this rod sounds like a rod should.Dave Kracht's 1940 Ford Sloper

To keep things simple and reliable, Dave retained the services of the factory 4spd overdrive auto’ gear box, even integrating the original shifter assembly into his incredible interior. Being the proprietor of DNA Motor Trim in Katoomba, Dave was in an excellent position to equip the Ford with a cabin to die for and that’s just what he delivered.

Based around two pairs of AU Falcon bucket seats, Dave created a supremely classy cabin that’s drenched in black leather, with the seats featuring tasteful embossed inserts that are mirrored on the door trims as well. Dave also constructed the full length centre console that includes that factory Dave Kracht's 1940 Ford Slopershifter, the door trims and the entire rear section that includes air vents and hides all the wiring and other ugly stuff.

As nicely as the completed car turned out, it’s the friendships and contact with the scene that proved most rewarding for Dave. “The best part of the build by far was reconnecting with Ralph,” Dave says. “I formed a very strong friendship with him during the project and I have become friends with many people during and after the build.”

Perhaps the sweetest moment of all came during the 2009 Custom Auto Expo state title show when Dave decided to enter the Ford as a kind of ‘completion of the circle’ that his dad started way back in 1968. “It ended up winning the Top Tudor award,” says Dave, still smiling at the memory. “Same car, same show, same award 41 years after it first won. It was a very satisfying moment and I was honoured to win.”

Owner: Dave Kracht
Engine: 1994 Lexus 4L Quad-Cam V8, ceramic-coated 4-into-1 headers, stainless twin exhaust, K&N pod filter, alloy radiator, alloy radiator overflow tank, thermo fan
Power: Untested
Trans: Factory Lexus electronic 4spd auto
Diff: Jaguar IRS, 3.54:1 final drive, LSD
Suspension: Rear coil-overs, fully boxed chassis rails w/tube cross members
Wheels: Coddington Stingray rims (15x6in front, 17x8in rear)
Brakes: XF Falcon front rotors, VS Commodore front calipers, Nissan Skyline rear calipers, in-board rear rotors, booster and master cylinder under-dash
Interior: AU Falcon ute front and rear buckets, black leather trim w/embossed inserts, grey carpets and grey cloth roof lining, Autometer gauges, Lexus shifter, custom centre console, custom roof pod and door trims
Thanks to: DNA Motor Trim, The Repair Wizard – Katoomba, Timic Hot Rod Supplies, Ralph and Annette Stapley, Ray Tobin, my son Kevin and all my friends and family who helped out and continue to do so

Feature Car: Smith Concepts’ Ford Model-A Hotrod


26 Feb

My photo shoot on Kyle Smith’s radical and retro Model-A Ford hotrod for issue nine of Forged magazine was actually the second time I’d photographed the car. The first time I laid eyes on the slammed, chopped and channelled Ford was several years ago when I shot the original iteration of it for another magazine. Once naturally aspirated and chunky metalflake orange, Kyle bought the car and truly made it his own. Issue nine of Forged is still available right now on newsstands nationwide.

BUY A SHIRT, PRINT AND MORE!

As always, we’ve got a series of FREE desktop wallpaper images for you to enjoy. Simply CLICK HERE or on the thumbnails below to visit our Flickr page where all the goodies lay in wait for your visit.

Smith Concepts Ford Model-A Hotrod

Smith Concepts Ford Model-A Hotrod

Smith Concepts Ford Model-A Hotrod

Feature Car: Alan Hale’s 1928 Ford Model-A Tudor


26 Sep

It’s not often I get to photograph a car that’s quite as hand-built as Alan Hale’s incredible Model-A Ford Tudor, as featured in the latest issue of Street Machine‘s Hot Rod special. Built over four years by Tony Webster at Webby’s Speed Shop in Newcastle, Australia, this thing just defies description!

BUY A SHIRT, PRINT AND MORE!

As always, we’ve got a series of FREE desktop wallpaper images for you to enjoy. Simply CLICK HERE or on the thumbnails below to visit our Flickr page where all the goodies lay in wait for your visit.

Alan Hale's 1928 Ford Model-A Tudor

Alan Hale's 1928 Ford Model-A Tudor     Alan Hale's 1928 Ford Model-A Tudor

Feature Car: Scott Riley’s Model-A Ford Hotrod


10 Jun

We originally photographed Scott Riley’s cool Model-A Ford pickup back in 2012 for a hot rod magazine that Hosking Industries was producing for Express Publications. Sadly the magazine closed and Scott’s pickup subsequently was never published… until recently. Street Fords magazine ran the feature on Scott’s truck in issue 147 and we’re stoked to see such a cool machine get the print time it deserves.

As always, we’ve got a series of FREE desktop wallpaper images for you to enjoy. Simply CLICK HERE or on the thumbnails below to visit our Flickr page where all the goodies lay in wait for your visit.

Scott Riley's Model-A Ford Hotrod

Scott Riley's Model-A Ford Hotrod    Scott Riley's Model-A Ford Hotrod

Feature Car: Rick Conway’s 1928 Ford Model-A Tudor


29 Dec

Our photo shoot and feature story on Rick Conway’s drool-worthy 1928 Model-A Tudor is in the latest issue of Cruzin magazine, which is on sale now. Rick’s Tudor started life as a roadster, but when his family expanded, so did the Model-A, with the body removed and replaced with an all-steel Tudor body. Be sure to read all about this immaculate machine in the new issue.

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As always, we’ve got a series of FREE desktop wallpaper images for you to enjoy. Simply CLICK HERE or on the thumbnails below to visit our Flickr page where all the goodies lay in wait for your visit.

Rick Conway's 1928 Ford Model-A Tudor

Rick Conway's 1928 Ford Model-A Tudor     Rick Conway's 1928 Ford Model-A Tudor

2016 is Coming! Three new calendar designs for the New Year


16 Nov

The new year is fast approaching and if you’re like us, you need a calendar to remind you of what date it is and what the hell you were supposed to be doing! Lucky then, that we’ve got three new calendar designs for the 2016 with all-new feature cars inside.

There’s a Holden-centric calendar, Commodore-themed version and a broad design that we like to call “12 of the Best”, which is a collection of our own favourite automotive images from the last 12 months. Go ahead, take your pick by CLICKING HERE or on the images below.

Not wishing to restrict your calendar-buying experience, you can still purchase calendar designs from years past, too. Simply make sure you select the starting month of your calendar as January 2016 and you’re good to go!

2016 Automotive Calendars

2016 Automotive Calendars

2016 Automotive Calendars